AskDefine | Define nixie

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Etymology

From German Nixe feminine of Nix, from Middle High German nickes, from Old High German nihhus ‘water-elf, crocodile’, cognate with Old English nicor ‘water-elf, hippopotamus, walrus’ (English nicker).

Pronunciation

  • /'nɪksi/

Noun

  1. a female water-elf
    • 1922: Bare from her garters up her flesh appears under the sapphire a nixie’s green. — James Joyce, Ulysses
  2. a piece of mail returned as undeliverable
    • mailers may also receive information on addresses that are undeliverable for reasons other than a customer move (i.e., nixie notifications) — United States Postal Service Address Change Service description
  3. a water spirit of either sex revered in Heathenry.

References

  • (paganism) 1993 Our Troth, the Ring of Troth and other true folk, ISBN 0-9623957-8-1,page 238.
    The word is the same as our English 'nicor' or the much dimished form, nixie.
  • (paganism)2000 Wights and Ancestors, Jenny Blain, Wyrds Wells, ISBN 0-9539044-0-7,page 1.
    'Nix' or nixie, a water-being, is Greek, relating to the Old English word 'nicor'.
  • (paganism)2002 Practical Magic in the Northern Tradition, Nigel Pennick, Thoth Publications, ISBN 1 870450 16 7, page 100.
    Water sprites have many names - nixies, kelpies, neckans, undines - which describe various elemental phenomena such as strong currents, whirlpools and tidal bores.

Extensive Definition

The word Nixie may mean:
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